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10 Book You Need to Read When You Bored With Daily Activity

Book become infamous now-a-days, but the story in book can't be left out. Sometimes we feel enjoyable when read books, in to our fantasy. Hope you enjoy your read time with this list.


Here some list top book you must read if you bored with your daily activity

10 Book You Need to Read When You Bored With Daily Activity


Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen


It is a fact universally acknowledged that every list of great books must include Pride and Prejudice.


Don’t be fooled by the bonnets and balls: beneath the sugary surface is a tart exposé of the marriage market in Georgian England.


For every lucky Elizabeth, who tames the haughty, handsome Mr Darcy and learns to know herself in the process, there’s a Charlotte, resigned to life with a drivelling buffoon for want of a pretty face.


The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13 ¾ by Sue Townsend


Read this one when you’re decrepit enough, and chances are you’ll die laughing.


No one has lampooned the self-absorption, delusions of grandeur and sexual frustration of adolescence as brilliantly as Sue Townsend, and no one ever will.


Beyond the majestic poetry and the pimples, there’s also a sharp satire of Thatcherist Britain.


Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl


From the overwhelming poverty experienced by Charlie Bucket and his family, to the spoilt, greedy, brattish children who join Charlie on his trip to Willy Wonka’s phantasmagorical sweet factory there is nothing artificially sweetened in Roald Dahl’s startling work of fantasy.


Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe


A classic exposé of colonialism, Achebe’s novel explores what happens to a Nigerian village when European missionaries arrive.


The main character, warrior-like Okonkwo, embodies the traditional values that are ultimately doomed. By the time Achebe was born in 1930, missionaries had been settled in his village for decades.


He wrote in English and took the title of his novel from a Yeats poem, but wove Igbo proverbs throughout this lyrical work. 


1984 by George Orwell


The ultimate piece of dystopian fiction, 1984 was so prescient that it’s become a cliche.


But forget TV’s Big Brother or the trite travesty of Room 101: the original has lost none of its furious force.


Orwell was interested in the mechanics of totalitarianism, imagining a society that took the paranoid surveillance of the Soviets to chilling conclusions.


Our hero, Winston, tries to resist a grey world where a screen watches your every move, but bravery is ultimately futile when the state worms its way inside your mind.


Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier


The second Mrs de Winter is the narrator of Du Maurier’s marvellously gothic tale about a young woman who replaces the deceased Rebecca as wife to the wealthy Maxim de Winter and mistress of the Manderley estate.


There she meets the housekeeper Mrs Danvers, formerly devoted to Rebecca, who proceeds to torment her. As atmospheric, psychological horror it just gets darker and darker.


Great Expectations by Charles Dickens


Dickens was the social conscience of the Victorian age, but don’t let that put you off. Great Expectations is the roiling tale of the orphaned Pip, the lovely Estella, and the thwarted Miss Havisham.


First written in serial form, you barely have time to recover from one cliffhanger before the next one beckons, all told in Dickens’ luxuriant, humorous, heartfelt prose.


To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee


A timeless plea for justice in the setting of America’s racist South during the depression years, Lee’s novel caused a sensation.


Her device was simple but incendiary: look at the world through the eyes of a six-year-old, in this case, Jean Louise Finch, whose father is a lawyer defending a black man falsely accused of raping a white woman.


Lee hoped for nothing but “a quick and merciful death at the hands of the reviewers”: she won the Pulitzer and a place on the curriculum. 


Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel


In an astonishing act of literary ventriloquism, Mantel inhabits a fictionalised version of Thomas Cromwell, a working-class boy who rose through his own fierce intelligence to be a key player in the treacherous world of Tudor politics. Historical fiction so immersive you can smell the fear and ambition. 


The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler


Dashiell Hammett may have been harder boiled, his plots more intricate but, wow, does Raymond Chandler have style.


The push and pull at the start of The Big Sleep between private detective Philip Marlowe, in his powder-blue suit and dark blue shirt, and Miss Carmen Sternwood, with her “little sharp predatory teeth” and lashes that she lowers and raises like a theatre curtain, sets the tone for a story of bad girls and bad men.


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